Wednesday, October 29, 2008

The Benefits Of Hemp

Hemp is quite simply, nature’s beauty secret - and the secret is in the seed. Hemp seed oil and extract offer many benefits useful in personal care products. The reason hemp is so effective is largely because of the essential fatty acids (EFAs) it contains. More than 75% of the EFAs in hemp seed oil are poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), known for their excellent emollient and lubricating properties.

Hemp seed oil contains what is considered to be an ideal ratio of Omega 6 and Omega 3 fatty acids- 3:1, perfectly matching the needs of the human body. In addition to the EFAs hemp seed provides, it is also one of The Earth’s richest sources of amino acids. Along with the EFAs, these two components are responsible for keratin formation, the primary protein that gives your hair structural integrity.

Facts on hemp

The hulled hempseed does not contain any THC. (THC is normally stored in the fleshy parts of the plant, especially the leaves. None is contained in the seeds, flowers, or roots of the plant.)

Hemp seed can be processed, much like soy, into many nutritious foods and cosmetic ingredients. Hemp seed is far more nutritious than even soybean oil and though it contains less total protein, it is far more digestible to humans.

Hemp seed contains, on average: 25% protein, 30% carbohydrates, 15% insoluable fiber, 30% oil, the nutrients carotene, phosphorous, potassium, magnesium, sulfur, calcium, iron, zinc, and the vitamins E, C, B1, B2, B3, and B6. Hemp seed also is one of the few seeds to contain Omega-6 and Omega-3 Linoleic acid, comonally found in fish and useful to the immune system.

Hemp oil has been found to be a highly nutritious, essential hair and skin aid for protection, growth and anti-aging.

Hemp has excellent healing and moisturizing properties.

Because of its EFA profile, hemp seed oil instantly counteracts the effects of degreasing and dehydration, conditions that produce dry skin and hair.

In addition to improving the structural quality of the hair, hemp seed oil's high lipid content helps increase elasticity, volume, combability and shine.

Hemp is used as fiber for rope, twine, tough cloth, and paper as well as other products where wood pulp is currently used.

Hemp could help preserve natural resources. For instance, hemp used for paper would replenish itself in 90 days instead of the 20-40 years required to grow trees.

An acre of hemp can produce 4 times the amount of paper that an acre of trees can produce.

Hemp requires no herbicides or pesticides for cultivation and refertilizes soil naturally making the ground useful for future crops.

History of hemp
Hemp has been in continual use by human civilization for at least 10,000 years.

The first written record of cannabis was supposedly penned by one of the early Chinese emperors around 2700 B.C.

Islamic/Arabic empires created Europe's first paper mill utilizing hemp in about 1150 A.D.

In 1563 A.D., as part of the economic and military buildup of the time (80 years war), Queen Elizabeth I orders all land owners with 60 acres or more to grow Cannibus or face a £5 fine.

For centuries the fiber of the hemp plant has been used for rope, sails and other textiles.

Early drafts of The Declaration of Independence and The Constitution were written on hemp paper.

George Washington and Thomas Jefferson both farmed hemp crops – the colonists were legally bound to grow hemp as one of their crops and could use hemp to pay their taxes. During times of shortage, farmers were sent to jail for not growing hemp.

In 1941 Popular Mechanics introduced Henry Ford's new plastic car, manufactured from and fueled by hemp (an early biodiesel variant). Hoping to break the petroleum industries' monopoly of control on his company, Ford illegally grew hemp for over a year.

The 1942 Japanese invasion of the Philippines cut off the US supply of Manila hemp, among other vital resources. The US government distributed over 400,000 pounds of hempseed to farmers in order to limit the supply gap as much as possible, subsidizing hemp cultivation during WWII. American farmers grew about a million acres as part of that program.

The Canadian government legalized the growth of industrial hemp for commercial purposes in 1998, issuing a license to Health Canada.

By 2004, four U.S. states had passed legislation to permit production of industrial hemp for research and commercial purposes; Hawaii, Maryland, North Dakota, and Minnesota. Legislatures in 5 other states (Illinois, Montana, Vermont, Virginia, and California) have passed declarations asking for a change in federal policy on the issue. Hemp-based products are legally sold within the United States.

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